Understanding fixtures and personal property in a real estate sale

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That perfect light fixture set off just the look you were aiming for when you when redecorated your living room.  As you are getting your home ready for the market you become reluctant to pack it up even though you have no plans of leaving it.

Now you are torn between the “staging effect” it can have on a buyer and the possibility of the light fixture becoming a negotiable item even though you state in your owners disclosure that it is not remaining and will be replaced with another fixture of the buyers choice within a stated allowance.

My suggestion is to remove it, because it may become the one item that tipped a buyer in your favor, and chances are they would have still offered to buy your home without it because the most important things like size, price and location are what they are really shopping for. Once a buyer sees it and likes it they will want it.

A stand alone lamp in the same room would be considered personal property but since the overhead light is attached by permanent wires it is considered a fixture and the buyer may assume it is included.

Both buyers and sellers alike overlook items and get surprised at a final walk though when they discover something must stay or go.  Some of the most common items I have re-negotiated at a final hour of closing the sale are:

  • Light fixtures
  • Mailboxes
  • Flowers and trees
  • Flower pots
  • Garden trellises
  • Fireplace mantles
  • Appliances
  • Portable appliances such as a water softeners, floor heaters , window unit air conditioner, humidifiers
  • Room size area rugs
  • Shelving units and bookcases that stand alone
  • Decorative light switch plates
  • Window treatments (blinds may stay but the curtains are removed)
  • Decorative faucets
  • Lawn ornaments
  • Window flower boxes
  • Garden hoses
  • Outdoor buildings (sheds)
  • Security systems (the owner may be obligated to a lease)

The easy solution to avoid these misunderstandings is a careful review of the checklist on a  owners disclosure statement regarding the items remaining with a home.  Also, a review of any exclusions on the Real Estate agents listing sheet, and always address any item of question in the purchase and sale agreement.  If there is an item of personal property that works well with a home a buyer can always ask for it or purchase it from the owner and note it on a personal property agreement.

Happy home buying and selling…:)

photo compliments of :https://pixabay.com/en/users/ChellyRika-3711680/

 

 

 

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About Alice DeForesthttp://easyrealestate.blogWith over 30 years experience in various phases of the real estate industry, I would like to have the opportunity to share some of the knowledge, hard work, and fun things with you. I have also had the opportunity to live in all four corners of the US , so I have been a buyer, seller, tenant, and landlord in my personal life. I am now a settled empty nester, which allows me the time to work on this blog...

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